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Department of Defense Program Announcement on Vascular Injury and Hemorrhage Control
Pre-application Submission Deadline: February 25, 2013

The Society for Vascular Surgery® would like to alert its membership that the Department of Defense is issuing a Program Announcement to solicit and fund research on the topics of vascular injury and hemorrhage control.

To learn more, access the grants.gov website at: http://www.grants.gov/search/basic.do​. Search funding opportunity: “W81XWH-13-CCCJPC6-FSERC” or use search term "Endovascular" to find the specific announcement.

Solicitations for research and technology related to vascular and endovascular surgery are relatively new within the Department of Defense and are an indication that the military recognizes the unique potential for this specialty area to reduce morbidity and mortality from vascular trauma and hemorrhage.

The Army’s Telemedicine & Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) is managing the Program Announcement which solicits pre-proposals for the outlined topics giving 30 days for response. The highest rated of these will be asked to submit full research proposals and those with the strongest scientific merit will be selected and funded. Submission of proposals is open to those in civilian academia, private industry and the US government.  
 
Wording of this Program Announcement (Topic B, #2) is as follows: 
 
Applied research leading to advances in catheter-based or endovascular control of and resuscitation from blood vessel injury or disruption and hemorrhagic shock is needed.
  • Specifically research is needed in the area of rapidly deployable, less invasive endovascular methods to monitor hemodynamics, control hemorrhage, sustain central myocardial and cerebral perfusion and stabilize vascular disruption within the torso. Similar methods should be researched to manage vascular disruption and hemorrhage from the junctional regions between the torso and the extremities.
  • Severe trauma to, or disruption of, the following vascular structures within the torso leads to non-compressible hemorrhage, shock and death: 1) named large (i.e. axial) vessels, 2) vessels within proximity to or within the parenchyma of the kidney, liver, spleen, 3) vessels within the parenchyma of the lung or 4) vessels of the pelvis. 
Targeted research should address at least one of the following:
  • Research on new or existing techniques and devices related to and facilitating safe and rapid, large vessel vascular access enabling expedited insertion of wires, sheaths, catheters, or other pressure monitoring devices into the human vasculature in the setting of hemorrhagic shock
  • Research to accurately quantify vascular morphometry of the human torso and junctional regions including use of volumes of detailed imaging data (retrospective or prospective) in trauma populations. Research should include characterization of population-based morphometry to include but not limited to torso vessel diameters, lengths and relative distances between major aortic branch vessels
  • Research on novel methods to employ endovascular techniques without the need for radiographic imaging should be pursued including expanded use of intravascular ultrasound or other guiding devices to allow fluoroscopy-free, rapid positioning of endovascular devices in emergency settings
  • Translational use of existing endovascular techniques and devices such as sheaths, balloons, stents and coils to control hemorrhage, that can serve as a life-sustaining resuscitation adjunct and/ or temporize or definitively treat the causative vascular injury
  • Development of new endovascular techniques and devices such as sheaths, balloons, stents and coils to control hemorrhage, that can serve as a life-sustaining resuscitation adjunct and/ or temporize or definitively treat the causative vascular injury
  • Characterization and optimization of human physiology following endovascular control of vascular injury and resuscitation. This research should include new methods to limit end organ ischemia in the setting of vascular injury and other means to reduce or mitigate loco-regional and systemic reperfusion injury
Updated January 2013

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VascularWeb® is the prime source for all vascular health and disease information, and is presented by the Society for Vascular Surgery®. Its members are vascular surgeons, specialists, and vascular health professionals who are specialty-trained in all treatments for vascular disease including medical management, non-invasive procedures, and surgery.