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 Outcomes of Open Repair of Complex Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Studied

EMBARGOED RELEASE, JUNE 17, 2011, 9:20 AM
May 16, 2011
Contact: Jill Goodwin, 312-334-2308
jgoodwin@vascularsociety.org
Media invited to attend – contact for credentials
Interviews available upon request
 
Classification system provides standard of comparison for fenestrated endovascular repair 
 
CHICAGO—Researchers from the Mayo Clinic's division of vascular and endovascular surgery in Rochester, Minn., have analyzed outcomes of open repair of complex abdominal aortic aneurysm (cAAA) based upon an anatomic and endovascular classification system, thereby providing a standard of comparison for fenestrated endovascular repair (FEVAR). Their findings were presented today at the 65th Vascular Annual Meeting® presented by the Society for Vascular Surgery®.

“We reviewed outcomes of 461 patients who underwent open cAAA repair from 2000-2010,” said Gustavo S. Oderich, MD, associate professor of surgery. “Preoperative digital imaging was analyzed by a blinded investigator using centerline of flow to define aneurysm extent and the expected number of fenestrations that would be required to provide 2 cm of proximal seal for FEVAR. End-points were mortality, morbidity, renal function (RF) deterioration, re-interventions and patient survival.”

Dr. Oderich added that there were 354 male and 107 female patients with mean age of 73±8 years. Operative mortality was 1.3 percent (6/461). Any morbidity occurred in 260 patients (57 percent), and was severe (SVS 3) in 91 (20 percent). Five-year patient survival, freedom from re-intervention, and freedom from RF deterioration respectively were 72±3 percent, 90±2 percent, and 84±3 percent. Increasing level of aneurysm complexity was associated with greater mortality, severe morbidity and dialysis rates using either classification system shown in the table below:
Table available upon request. Contact jgoodwin@vascularsociety.org or 312-334-2308.
  
Open cAAA repair can be performed safely with low mortality (1.3 percent) but with a high risk of complications. These data stratified by anatomic classification and the expected number of fenestrations provide a benchmark for comparison with results of FEVAR.
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The Society for Vascular Surgery® (SVS) is a not-for-profit professional medical society, composed primarily of vascular surgeons, that seeks to advance excellence and innovation in vascular health through education, advocacy, research, and public awareness. SVS is the national advocate for 3,350 specialty-trained vascular surgeons and other medical professionals who are dedicated to the prevention and cure of vascular disease. Visit its Web site at www.VascularWeb.org® and follow SVS on Twitter by searching for VascularHealth or at http://twitter.com/VascularHealth.

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VascularWeb® is the prime source for all vascular health and disease information, and is presented by the Society for Vascular Surgery®. Its members are vascular surgeons, specialists, and vascular health professionals who are specialty-trained in all treatments for vascular disease including medical management, non-invasive procedures, and surgery.